Sick days due to stress rise in public health workers


Over the last four years sick days taken for stress-related illnesses has sharply risen for the East of England Ambulance Service (EEAS).

Stress affects many people’s lives, and the rise and fall of it is often mirrored in the number of sick days taken, especially among those who have highly stressful jobs, such as the ambulance service.

The police force and fire fighters also suffer from high levels of stress related sick days, being some of the most stressful jobs to have.

12,844 days were taken off altogether as a result of stress in 2013, compared to just 4,526 in 2010. These statistics were acquired by media sites via a freedom of information request.

This rise in sick days is occurring despite the fact (or maybe because of the fact) that staff numbers of the EEAS have dropped by 159 between these years.

Many people lost their jobs throughout the country during the recession, through cuts and money saving exercises. Despite this the public sector emergency services still have to do the same stressful jobs, but with less people to do it, a factor only made worse by more people taking days off.

Hopefully, now that we are supposedly coming out of the financial crisis, we can hope that in the near future, staff levels will increase again and remove the pressure from those bearing the load.

It shows that everyone is suffering and we are becoming a society of pressur and stress that people just can’t handle. Mindfulness courses and techniques can be used to alleviate the symptoms, but the causes are ongoing and people are still pressured and suffering with mental health problems like depression.

Stress Management News

Events and Workshops

Advertisements